Shri Vidya

Sauh(सौः) seed(बीज)

Sauh (सौः) is para (परा) the infinite. It’s combined Shiv and Shakti beeja as colon(two dots). She represents the पद दवयं-combined Shiv Shakti. रक्त(Red-Devi’s Light) शुक्ल(White-Shiva’s light) मिश्र (conjunct) – Means Devi’s red light and Shiva’s white light conjunct as “Sauh” seed.This light only seen when Sauh sound is vibrated enough to release the light from Sahastrar Chakra on the crown of the head. Red-White light also represents Ardhanarishwar as a Guru.

Source: Discussion with Rakeshbhai Vyas UK.

Shri Vidya Guru Shri Ganpatram ji

On the 6th day of mantra Anusthan, I would like to introduce another shinning sun of my Guru Mandal (Circle of Gurus) who nurtured and spread the Shri Vidya Reet for hundred of years. This my tribute to the Guru Mandal.

Shri Ganpatram Dave was  the Guru of Shri Vidya Kashi Pashupat Parampara, who started to spread the Vidya (knowledge) to the worthy ones across the Gujarat. He was the Guru of very popular world famous singer Pandit Jasraj. He is my Paratpar Guru. His son Shri Vasudevbhai installed Shri Yantra in Ambaji temple (http://www.ambajitemple.in/). Which is a biggest place of pilgrimage in Gujarat state for Shakti worshippers.

He lived in his mortal body for more than 100 years and never wore any sewn clothes or shoes as in Hindu philosophy sewn clothes are not recommended for people aspiring for higher spiritual growth.

Shri Ganpatramji was main disciple of Shri Sitaram Bhatt ji of Pune (https://aishwaryanand.com/2017/12/11/shri-vidya-guru-shri-sitaramji-bhatt/). It is said that when Shri Sitaram Guruji on the edge of Mahasamadhi (casting off his physical body) his all Shishyas (Students) came to see him. Shri Ganpatram dada came and did his puja and drunk the Charnamrut of Shri Sitaramji and all the powers and knowledge got transferred into Shri Ganpatramji. It was unknown to other students so the students asked, ” Guruji (Sitaramji) ! Do you want to say (give any further knowledge which is still available to you) anything?” Guruji said, “All the knowledge is went to Gujarat with Ganpatramji”. He was a carrier of  complete and correct(without any misinterpretations)  knowledge of Shri Vidya Parampara of 100s of years. He was the one who could correct the Shankaracharya in many matters of philosophy.

Shri Ganapatram Dave was a great scholar, actually one of the greatest Vedantists of the time and was bestowed the title Ved Martand Tantra Shiromani by Dwarka Shankaracharya.

Apart for running a Gurukul for Vedas, Guruji was the trusted advisor to the Kings of Gujarat and advised the installation of the Bhuvaneshwari Amba Murthi in Gondal.  The purpose of this was to aid the struggle for independence from the British Raj.  He was known throughout India as one of the greatest Tantriks of the Century and even today holy places like Kamakhya to Rameshearam still carry his memories.

He had many devoted shisyas such as his son Shri Vasudevbhai, Shri Nandkishore Vyas, Shri Pratap Rai, Harshad Bhai, Shri Girjashankar Rawal and Smt Tarlaben Rawal.

His main shishya to whom Guruju passed the Gurugadi to was Shri Devshankar Trivedi of Sanand and Raja Jayvant Singh, renouned Kali Upasak and King of Sanand.

Famous for his contribution to the world of classical musical he gave the World many new ragas and compositions to enjoy.

His main shishya to who Guruji passed the Gurugadi to was Shri Devshankar Trivedi of Sanand. Guruji was the one of the greatest Kaulupasakas of the time and gave Diksha to and guided many in Shri and Kali Kul. A prime example was Raja JayawantSingh (king of Sanand), who was frequently visited in the palace by Adhya and Batuknath and created many ragas and compositions. Another shisya is the great PanditJasraj, of the famous mewathigharana, famous for his contribution to the world of classical music.

Gurudev wrote the Shri Vidya Mani Ratna Saparya Padhati in the 1800s, which is still used today. Furthermore, the Ambaji Shri yantra was reinstalled by him and as a result has many shisiyas in Siddhpur and Kamakhya. During his life he had met up with Pujya Gurudev Shri Devi Ba and was taken aback by her devotion. He wished to give her Diksha but unfortunately they never met after this. Gurudev lived for over 100 years after which he achieved Manidweep.

Below photo of Shri Vasudevbhai Ganpatram Dave who installed Yantraraj Shri Yantra at Ambaji temple.

Shri Vidya Guru Shri Achyutananda Nath

Friends,

I am back after a long time, I would like to introduce a very new phase of my spiritual journey with Shri Vidya Kashi Pashupat Reet (method) Parampara .

While doing Guru mantra Anusthan, I would like to introduce my Guru Mandal (Circle of Gurus) who nurtured and spread the Shri Vidya Reet for hundred of years. This my tribute to the Guru Mandal.

Shri Achyutananda Nath (Kaul Bhattji) was the Guru of Shri Vidya Kashi Pashupat Sampraday, who started to spread the Vidya (knowledge) to the worthy ones across the India. He casted his physical body off 127 years before but I can feel his presence while doing the Anusthan.

Sri Achyutananda Nath is the 241st Guru in the lineage of Shri Vidya Pashupat Sampraday, which branched off to Trika and Kashmir Shaivism.

Sri Achyutananda Nathji was born as Sri DamodarRamkrishna Bhatt on Adhik Jyestha, Krishna-Paksha Pratipada in 1839. At the age of 8, known as DamodarRamkrishna Bhatt, Gurudev left Gwalior for Kashi. In Kashi he was initiated in the spiritual system of Shri Vidya by Sri Vikaranandnath, He was given Purnadiksha by Shri Kashi Vishwanath. Guruji was famous around the Temple of Vishwanathji, and was known as Kaul Bhatt. His sadhana was unparalleled especially in Batuk Bhairav and was well renowned in the highest spiritual circles.

By the grace of his Guru, he was given the Lineage of ‘Pashupath Shri Vidya’ which was near extinction at the time. Furthermore, with the Divine blessings from the Shankracharya at that time Sri AchyutanandaNathji took an oath to propagate this rare Marg. 

Gurudev had many Siddhis and had perfected the Sadhana of both Sarbheshwar and Batuk Bhairav and these devtas were always seen to be with him. Not only was he the main propagator of the rare and nearly extinct Pashupat Sampradaya (of the 8 Shri Vidya Gupta Sampradayas), he was also the master in Mallkhambh and had won many accolades in wrestling. He was given and perfected this Siddhi from Shri Hanumnaji (please see the following you tube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1NW7etjbls).

 Guruji later set up and opened up many centres around Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh and Puna which are still practicing this art.

Gurudev was a great Adept at the time in Shri Vidya (Pashupati Reethi)sadhana and initiated many disciples including Jahansi Ki Rani, Tatyatope Peshwa Baji Rao II, Bal Krishna Gangadhar Tilak and Shri Sitaram Bhatt (Puna) to name a few. It is rumoured that the Bhairavi, who taught Sri Ramakrshna Paramhamsa was his doing.

Once Swami Vivekananda had returned from Chicago, he was advised by Shri Ramkrishna Paramhamsa to go to Kashi and learn Shri Vidya from Achhytuanandji. Amongst the great Siddhas of Kashi, Shri Achyutanandji was exceptionally famous and always had huge crowds jostling to meet and receive his blessings. Guruji wanted to escape this extreme attention and eventually left Kashi Mokhsa Puri and went to Haridwar, where he took Jaal Samadhi. Those who witnessed his Jaal Samadhi, witnessed Maha Kali, Batuk Bhairav and Lord Shiva blessing him and before his disappearance, he handed over the Guru lineage to Shri Sitaram Bhatt – Puna

To this day, Shri Achutanandji’s Akhadas are still found in Kashi, Gwalior and Puna.

He reached Manidweepam on 27/09/1890.
In this Diwali time Shri Urvashiben (my beloved Guru Baa) and Rakeshbhai (My Guide and Guru) with other upasaks visited Gurudev’s Akhada in Kashi and Malkam Stambh Pujan, Photos as follows..

Gurudev’s Akhada is behing Kaal Bhairav nath temple, Kashi, a place called bibi satiya, asķ any one where is Kaul Bhatt ka Akhada.

Shri Vidya Guru Shri Sitaramji Bhatt

While doing Guru mantra Anusthan on 5th day out of love, I would like to introduce my Guru Mandal (Circle of Gurus) who nurtured and spread the Shri Vidya Reet for hundred of years. This my tribute to the Guru Mandal.

Shri Sitaramji Bhatt was the Guru of Shri Vidya Kashi Pashupat Parampara, who started to spread the Vidya (knowledge) to the worthy ones across the Gujarat and Maharashtra. He casted his physical body off 80 years before but I can feel his presence while doing the Anusthan.

Shri Sitaram Guruji of Pune (Shree Prakashanandanathji) was born at Pandavwadi Tal –Wai Dist – Satara M.S. on 8th Jan 1866.  In 1881 Shri Sitaram Guruji married Shri Venutai Vasudev Bhide.  They had two daughters, Sundaratai and Awaditai & two sons Ananta and Narayan.   Furthermore, Ananta had four sons – Govinda, Vighnanash, Nagnath and Ramkrishna.

Shri Sitaram Guruji was the passed on the Gurugadi from his Guru Acchyutanandji (https://aishwaryanand.com/2017/12/11/shri-vidya-guru-shri/) and was a great personality of his time.  He was a close friend of Akal Kot Baba and when Shridi Sai baba was returning after a long absence, he was troubled by his awakened Kundalini.  He was advised to seek Shri Sitaram Guruji and learn the techniques of kundalini yoga to control his Kundalini energy!

 Shree Sitaram Guruji suffered from TB & he was protected by his Guru Shri Acchyutanand Guruji through Parthiv Puja Anushthan.  In 1882, Shri Sitaramguruji received his Purnabhishek.   At the time, Guruji was serving as a School teacher in the Deccan Education Society’s School.  He graduated in Law and was appointed Chief Justice in Manasa State, Gujarat,  by the then King of Manasa state.  Later the King actually became a disciple of Shri  Sitaramguruji himself.

Address of above place: बुधवारी पेठ, दगडू शेठ गणपति मंदिर के पास, पुणे।।

Guruji revived the Divine tradition of Sri Vidya in Gujarat.  After resigning from the position of Chief Justice, Shri Sitaram Guruji relocated to in Gujarat.  During this time, many people were blessed with Diksha in Gujarat.  Although being an Advocate Judge he had complete mastery over Sanskrit.   

Shri Sitaram Guruji was very famous and celebrated in Maharashtra for his Siddhis.

 He was the Nyadish of Mansa Darbar and was a advisor to many courts of Gujarat, including Sayavji Gaekwad.

Shri Sitaram Guruji was Freedom fighter, Politician , Vedic & Tantric authority & Astrologer.  His renowned disciples include Shri Ganpatram Dave, Prof. Shri H.B.Bhide, Shri Vasudevrao Moholkar, Shri Shanker Waman Oak, Shri & Sau. Panditkaka Joglekar, Shri Swami Bhonde, Shri Kaka Lavalekar.

Guruji inititated Bal Ganagadar Tilak into Purnadiksha and advised him to perform the Ganesh Utsav.  This was necessary at the time, due to the British Raj, and by instigating this festival, united all and helped in the Free India campaign.  As a result of this, the Ganesh Utsav has become a world wide phenomenon, celebrated with great pomp and positive energy.

In 1905 he returned to Pune & started Bhajan Sanstha having more than 200 followers.  At the time to Mahasamaadhi, Guruji, transferred his blessings and powers to Shri Ganapatram Dave who continued to restablish Shri Vidya in Gujurat.

Guruji’s Peetham in above picture is still active in Pune and is currently being cared for by Shreemati Sudhavahini Nagnath Bhatt & Ku. Shubhda Ramkrishna Bhat who perform Guruparampara Karya at Pune along with Shri Vilas Vaishampayan.

On 13/4/1937 Shri Sitaramguruji departed for Manidweep.  To this date, Gurukarya is progressing due to his continuing Krupa Prasaad & Aashirvad.

Ramayan is not a myth it is “itihasa”

Very important study proves  “Itihasa= it has happened” bursting the claims of myth makers (Thapars, Devdutt Pattnaiks etc) of India.

http://www.sanskritimagazine.com/indian-religions/hinduism/three-year-long-botanical-study-confirms-ramayan-is-not-a-myth/

http://indiafacts.org/the-scientific-dating-of-the-ramayana/

29# Year 2016’s Resolution- Self-Realization

Dear Readers

Happy New Year

Sorry for coming on the blog after long time.

This is the start of the year but I have crossed my annual reading/listening goal for self-realization, what I actually am and this is the only resolution for year 2016 for me and will be forever in my resolution list.

(Source: Google Images)

Same as last year due to time and other commitments, I couldn’t read any of the books through physical copies but thanks to modern day technology either be it converting YouTube videos into MP3 or text-to-speech technology of Kindle books, I could listen more than 100 an hour lectures and 5 very hefty books till date but recommending 3 of those very thought provoking.

Here is the list of books which may interest you. You can use your commute time to listen such wonderful books.

Some are here which themselves keep you pondering into the deep thought process. Each chapter of these books themselves are the topics  require days of debate and discussions and can become the books by themselves.

1) Being Different By Rajiv Malhotra

Synopsis

“India is more than a nation state. It is also a unique civilization with philosophies and cosmologies that are markedly distinct from the dominant culture of our times – the West. India’s spiritual traditions spring from dharma which has no exact equivalent in western frameworks. Unfortunately, in the rush to celebrate the growing popularity of India on the world stage, its civilizational matrix is being digested into western universalism, thereby diluting its distinctiveness and potential.

This book addresses the challenge of direct and honest engagement on differences, by reversing the gaze, repositioning India from being the observed to the observer and looking at the West from the dharmic point of view. In doing so it challenges many hitherto unexamined beliefs that both sides hold about themselves and each other. It highlights that unique historical revelations are the basis for western religions, as opposed to dharma’s emphasis on self-realization in the body here and now. It describes the integral unity that underpins dharma’s metaphysics and contrasts this with western thought and history as a synthetic unity. The west’s anxiety over difference and fixation for order runs in contrast with the creative role of chaos in dharma. The book critiques fashionable reductive translations and argues for preserving certain non-translatable words of Sanskrit. It concludes with a rebuttal against western claims of universalism and recommends a multi-civilizational worldview.

The discussions and debate within the book employ the venerable tradition of purva-paksha, an ancient dharmic technique where a debater must first authentically understand in the opponent’s perspective, test the merits of that point of view and only then engage in debate using his own position. Purva-paksha encourages individuals to become truly knowledgeable about all perspectives, to approach the other side with respect and to forego the desire to simply win the contest. Purva-paksha also demands that all sides be willing to embrace the shifts in thinking, disruptive and controversial as they may be, that emerge from such a dialectical process.

Being Different highlights six distinct and fundamental points of divergence between the dharmic traditions and the West. These are as follows:

1) Approaches to difference: The West’s pervasive anxiety over personal and cultural differences have resulted in the endless need for the appropriation, assimilation, “conversion” and/or digestion and obliteration of all that does not fit its fundamental paradigms. The roots of this anxiety lie in the inherent schisms in its worldview. Dharmic traditions, in contrast, while not perfect, are historically more comfortable with differences, both individual and collective; they are not driven by mandates for expansion and control.

2) History-centrism vs. Inner Sciences: The Judeo-Christian religious narrative is rooted in the history of a specific people and place. Further, the divine is external rather than within and guides humanity through unique and irreplaceable revelations. The dharmic traditions, in contrast, emphasize a series of sophisticated techniques of meditation and related inner sciences to achieve higher states of embodied knowing.

3) Integral unity vs. synthetic unity: Since the time of Aristotle, the West has assumed an atomic partitioning of reality into distinct and unrelated parts. The Judeo-Christian worldview is based on separate essences for God, the world and/ human souls. Additionally, there is an unbridgeable gap between Greek reason and religious revelation. The result has been a forced unity of separate entities, and such a unity always feels threatened to disintegrate and remains synthetic at best. In dharmic cosmology all things emerge from a unified whole. In Hinduism this integral unity is the very nature of Brahman; in Buddhism there is no ultimate essence like Brahman, but the principle of impermanence and co-dependence provides unity. Dharma and science are enmeshed as part of the same exploration. Every aspect of reality mirrors and relates to every other aspect in a web of interdependency.

4) The nature of chaos and uncertainty: The West privileges order in its aesthetics, ethics, religions, society and politics, and manifests a deep-rooted fear of chaos, uncertainty and complexity. The dharmic worldview see chaos as a creative catalyst built into the cosmos to balance out order that could become stultifying., and hence it adopts a more relaxed attitude towards it

5) Translatability vs. Sanskrit: Unlike Western languages, in Sanskrit the fundamental sounds have an existential link to the experience of the object they represent. This makes Sanskrit a key resource for personal and cultural development. It also implies that the process of translation and digestion into Western schemas is unavoidably reductive.

6) Western universalism challenged: In the “grand narrative” of the West, whether secular or religious, it is the agent or driver of historical unfolding and sets the template for all nations and peoples. This book challenges this self-serving universalism. It contrasts this with dharma’s non-linear approach to the past and multiple future trajectories.

The very openness that makes dharma appealing, however, often makes it vulnerable to invasion, appropriation and erosion by a more aggressive and externally ambitious civilization. The book uses the metaphor of digestion to point to the destructive effects of what is usually white-washed as assimilation, globalization or postmodern deconstruction of difference. For complex reasons, which are analyzed at length, the dharmic traditions have been a particular target of digestion into the West, and Being Different challenges the uncritical acceptance of this process by both Westerners and Indians.”

2) Breaking India by Rajiv Malhotra

“India’s integrity is being undermined by three global networks that have well-established operating bases inside India: (i) Islamic radicalism linked with Pakistan, (ii) Maoists and Marxist radicals supported by China via intermediaries such as Nepal, and (iii) Dravidian and Dalit identity separatism being fostered by the West in the name of human rights. This book focuses on the third: the role of U.S. and European churches, academics, think-tanks, foundations, government and human rights groups in fostering separation of the identities of Dravidian and Dalit communities from the rest of India. The book is the result of five years of research, and uses information obtained in the West about foreign funding of these Indian-based activities. The research tracked the money trails that start out claiming to be for “education,” “human rights,” “empowerment training,” and “leadership training,” but end up in programs designed to produce angry youths who feel disenfranchised from Indian identity. The book reveals how outdated racial theories continue to provide academic frameworks and fuel the rhetoric that can trigger civil wars and genocides in developing countries. The Dravidian movement’s 200-year history has such origins. Its latest manifestation is the “Dravidian Christianity” movement that fabricates a political and cultural history to exploit old faultlines. The book explicitly names individuals and institutions, including prominent Western ones and their Indian affiliates. Its goal is to spark an honest debate on the extent to which human rights and other “empowerment” projects are cover-ups for these nefarious activities. For more information, or to view videos about this book, visit www.breakingindia.com

3) Rearming Hinduism by Vamsee Juluri

“Rearming Hinduism is a handbook for intellectual resistance. Through an astute and devastating critique of Hinduphobia in today’s academia, media and popular culture, Vamsee Juluri shows us that what the Hinduphobic worldview denies virulently is not only the truth and elegance of Hindu thought, but the very integrity and sanctity of the natural world itself.

By boldly challenging some of the media age’s most popular beliefs about nature, history, and pre-history along with the Hinduphobes’ usual myths about Aryans, invasions, and blood-sacrifices, Rearming Hinduism links Hinduphobia and its hubris to a predatory and self-destructive culture that perhaps only a renewed Hindu sensibility can effectively oppose. It is a call to see the present in a way that elevates our desa and kala to the ideals of the sanathana dharma once again. 

“For a civilization is not just buildings and machines, but its people, their thought, and their culture. It is a way of knowing the world, a way of giving meaning and value to the contents of life. It is a resource, most of all, for living intelligently.” 

There are hundreds of videos have been watched, listened and thousands of online articles have been read on the same topics. I will share few best one in my next post.

Later this year I have started practicing meditative and self healing technique called Agnihotra which is Vedic technology. Benefits are enormous. I will share whole blog in relation to Agnihotra in upcoming future.

Hope this one will broaden your vision and you realize your self being.

Happy Reading……